Miaka in Love

MIAKA IN LOVELIFE

651 notes

wildcat2030:

Cognitive celebrity -Albert Einstein was a genius, but he wasn’t the only one – why has his name come to mean something superhuman? - Before he died, Albert Einstein requested that his whole body be cremated as soon as possible after death, and his ashes scattered in an undisclosed location. He didn’t want his mortal remains to be turned into a shrine, but his request was only partially heeded. Einstein’s closest friend, the economist Otto Nathan, took possession of his ashes, but not before Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed the autopsy, removed his brain. Family and friends were aghast, but Harvey convinced Einstein’s son Hans Albert to give his reluctant permission after the fact. The eccentric doctor kept the brain in a glass jar of formalin inside a cider box under a cooler, until 1998, when he returned it to Princeton Hospital, and from time to time, he would send little chunks of it to interested scientists. Most of us will never be victims of brain-theft and ash hoarding, but Einstein’s status as the archetypical genius of modern times singled him out for special treatment. An ordinary person can live and die privately, but a genius – and his grey matter – belongs to the world. Even in his lifetime, which coincided with the first great flowering of mass media, Einstein was a celebrity, as famous for his wit and white shock of hair as he was for his science. Indeed, his life seems to have been timed perfectly to take advantage of the proliferations of newspapers and radio shows, whose reports often framed Einstein’s theories as being incomprehensible to anyone but the genius himself. There’s no doubt that Einstein’s contributions to science were revolutionary. Before he came along, cosmology was a part of philosophy but, thanks to him, it’s become a branch of science, tasked with no less than a mathematical history and evolution of the Universe. Einstein’s work also led to the discovery of exotic physical phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, quantum entanglement, the Big Bang, and the Higgs boson. But despite this formidable scientific legacy, Einstein’s fame owes something more to our culture’s obsession with celebrity. In many ways, Einstein was well-suited for celebrity. Apart from his distinctive coif, he had a way with words and, as a result, he is frequently quoted, occasionally with bon mots he didn’t actually say. More than anything, Einstein possessed the distinctive mystique of genius, a sense that he was larger than life, or different from the rest of us in some fundamental way, which is why so many people were desperate to get hold of his brain. (via Why is Einstein the poster boy for genius? – Matthew Francis – Aeon)

wildcat2030:

Cognitive celebrity
-
Albert Einstein was a genius, but he wasn’t the only one – why has his name come to mean something superhuman?
-
Before he died, Albert Einstein requested that his whole body be cremated as soon as possible after death, and his ashes scattered in an undisclosed location. He didn’t want his mortal remains to be turned into a shrine, but his request was only partially heeded. Einstein’s closest friend, the economist Otto Nathan, took possession of his ashes, but not before Thomas Harvey, the pathologist who performed the autopsy, removed his brain. Family and friends were aghast, but Harvey convinced Einstein’s son Hans Albert to give his reluctant permission after the fact. The eccentric doctor kept the brain in a glass jar of formalin inside a cider box under a cooler, until 1998, when he returned it to Princeton Hospital, and from time to time, he would send little chunks of it to interested scientists. Most of us will never be victims of brain-theft and ash hoarding, but Einstein’s status as the archetypical genius of modern times singled him out for special treatment. An ordinary person can live and die privately, but a genius – and his grey matter – belongs to the world. Even in his lifetime, which coincided with the first great flowering of mass media, Einstein was a celebrity, as famous for his wit and white shock of hair as he was for his science. Indeed, his life seems to have been timed perfectly to take advantage of the proliferations of newspapers and radio shows, whose reports often framed Einstein’s theories as being incomprehensible to anyone but the genius himself.
There’s no doubt that Einstein’s contributions to science were revolutionary. Before he came along, cosmology was a part of philosophy but, thanks to him, it’s become a branch of science, tasked with no less than a mathematical history and evolution of the Universe. Einstein’s work also led to the discovery of exotic physical phenomena such as black holes, gravitational waves, quantum entanglement, the Big Bang, and the Higgs boson. But despite this formidable scientific legacy, Einstein’s fame owes something more to our culture’s obsession with celebrity. In many ways, Einstein was well-suited for celebrity. Apart from his distinctive coif, he had a way with words and, as a result, he is frequently quoted, occasionally with bon mots he didn’t actually say. More than anything, Einstein possessed the distinctive mystique of genius, a sense that he was larger than life, or different from the rest of us in some fundamental way, which is why so many people were desperate to get hold of his brain. (via Why is Einstein the poster boy for genius? – Matthew Francis – Aeon)

(via afro-dominicano)

71 notes

thinkwingman:

The Most Luxurious Way To Make Waves
If you’re the type of guy who pines at the thought of a round-the-world cruise, just as much as you love the idea of getting a go in one of the many seriously suave super cars on shows like Top Gear, then luxury vehicle manufacturers Strand Craft may have just found the perfect piece of extravagance for you: the V8 Wet Rod.
Slightly questionable name aside, this futuristic-looking Jet Ski is unquestionably the crème de la crème of personal watercrafts. Furnished with a multitude of gadgets including a waterproof luggage box and hidden ice box to keep you well equipped, GPS navigation to ensure you stay on course, and a V8 engine (often found in Ferrari’s, Lamborghini’s and the like) to help it hit an impressive 65 MPH top speed; this remarkable piece of kit couldn’t be further away from the droves of slowly sinking dinghys you’ll be sure to leave in your wake, should you find yourself at the helm of one.
There’s no official word on the price yet, however you can head over to here to find out more about the Wet Rod, including further details on interiors, custom paint jobs, and more.

thinkwingman:

The Most Luxurious Way To Make Waves

If you’re the type of guy who pines at the thought of a round-the-world cruise, just as much as you love the idea of getting a go in one of the many seriously suave super cars on shows like Top Gear, then luxury vehicle manufacturers Strand Craft may have just found the perfect piece of extravagance for you: the V8 Wet Rod.

Slightly questionable name aside, this futuristic-looking Jet Ski is unquestionably the crème de la crème of personal watercrafts. Furnished with a multitude of gadgets including a waterproof luggage box and hidden ice box to keep you well equipped, GPS navigation to ensure you stay on course, and a V8 engine (often found in Ferrari’s, Lamborghini’s and the like) to help it hit an impressive 65 MPH top speed; this remarkable piece of kit couldn’t be further away from the droves of slowly sinking dinghys you’ll be sure to leave in your wake, should you find yourself at the helm of one.

There’s no official word on the price yet, however you can head over to here to find out more about the Wet Rod, including further details on interiors, custom paint jobs, and more.